Pachinko

So Pachinko is apparently huge in Japan. I’m really interested in what makes games of chance hugely successful. If you were to deconstruct their appeal or addictiveness what are their components exactly? In particular I’m interested in how much of the interaction mix relates to it’s inherent aesthetics and how much of it is due to interaction and the social constructs around it?

interesting account here of what they’re like here

b-pachinko-a-20150325-870x579

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/tag/pachinko/

https://www.segasammy.co.jp/english/ir/management/market/

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Game-Inspired Infographics on User Engagement and Information Paper.

Saw this paper tweeted by an Academic we’ve collaborated with as an advisor on a health project that we worked on last year.

‘Impact of Game-Inspired Infographics on User Engagement and
Information Processing in an eHealth Program’

https://www.jmir.org/article/download/jmir_v18i9e237/2

“The infographics employed in this study were inspired by
concepts underlying gamification”

I’ve had an excited, first pass read of the paper, it seems to imply that even some ‘game-inspired infographics’ have the potential to change behaviour. We’re not talking full on gamification here, we’re talking things that look like progress bars.

and encouragingly:

“Overall, findings support the use of game-inspired infographics in behavioral assessment feedback to enhance comprehension and engagement, which may lead to greater behavior change.”

The only thing I would have liked to have a bit of an expansion on are the effectiveness of the visuals and the impact of different formats and contexts they’re presented to users in. Seems that they used Amazon Mechanical Turks for the survey aspects.

Overall, findings support the use of game-inspired infographics in behavioral assessment feedback to enhance comprehension and engagement, which may lead to greater behavior change. KEYWORDS:

Source: Impact of Game-Inspired Infographics on User Engagement and Information Processing in an eHealth Program. – PubMed – NCBI

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Constant Checking

There’s got to be some incredible addictiveness / we’re achieving symbiosis with our personal computers type of research here and research on how much they’re actually complicating up our lives. “More than a third of 18 to 44 year olds have had disagreements with their partners over how much they use their smartphones, with 38 percent — the highest percentage — of 25 to 34 year olds saying their device had caused arguments”

https://twitter.com/i/moments/780283427035684864

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The 280-Year-Old Algorithm Inside Google Trips

It’s easy to see that the process of finding the most efficient route and accomplishing a series of tasks while you’re visiting places optimally along that route isn’t a contemporary problem. I love how a lot of what we take for cutting edge and awesome today is fuelled by research and science of old. This is a really in depth article about Google Trips drawing in part on Euler’s work in its algorithm for travel itineraries.

Source: Research Blog: The 280-Year-Old Algorithm Inside Google Trips

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Imposter Syndrome

I love this series by the design team.

The Design Team: The Imposter

Time and time again, I’ve come across people talking about imposter syndrome especially in the field of design. I’ve never felt that in design, maybe its because I’m usually operating at the right level for me and not putting myself in crazy situations which are unknown and cause other anxieties to surface, or maybe it’s because I’ve been doing it for a while.

But I know there are situational feelings and emotions that can manifest themselves as the symptoms and doubts people normally associate with imposter syndrome.

I did feel imposter syndrome for a year or so when I was teaching back in 2005. I kept thinking, you’ve definitely forest gumped your way here and you don’t deserve this.

My saving grace then was the fact that I somehow innately thought it was normal. We have a tendency to label stuff, to self diagnose ourselves and sometimes we’re spot on. Like I know I have some hidden degree of OCD and it gets worse when I’m stressed, but the key to gaining control of it is to own it.

The comic sums it up nicely.

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